Redheads in the Sun

The sun. It hates me.

The sun. It hates me.

I am a red head. As such, I am also an individual who is very at risk for skin cancer due to low levels of melanin. Couple that with the fact that my uncle died of skin cancer, and you see very readily that I have a personal interest in the prevention of this cancer. Gardner (2006) might mention that I live a life which exemplifies my cause.

In order for a campaign seeking to prevent skin cancer to be successful, of course, previous research would have had to have been conducted to determine the target audiences (in this case, the assumption is that we decided on red heads as the target, because that’s who I’m targeting in this assignment).

We could have come to this conclusion by looking at secondary research about skin cancer and prevalence, as well as past campaigns. For example, the CDC (2011) has implemented toolkits for distribution to students via school, media campaigns, grants, and a wide variety of partnerships to promote safe exposure to natural and unnatural UV exposure.

If we were to conduct primary research, we may conduct surveys measuring what people know about prevalence, risks, and prevention and do in a variety of states (some northern, some southern, etc.) or even countries (Scotland, Ireland and Australia have the largest concentrations of red heads). We could also as the same respondents how much sun block they wear and how often, making sure to also ask what prevents them from wearing it more often.

If we were to dig through all of the research, it consistently says that those with light skin and eyes, freckles or moles, and blonde or red hair are more at risk.  From there, we could have chosen our target audience (the one that I chose because I would very much like to see a campaign like this exist). These people are more likely to be aware of the danger they face, and so, as Kotler and Lee (2008) state, they are an audience more likely to be easily persuaded.

The focus of this campaign would be to promote the distribution and use of stronger SPF sunblocks and information dissemination regarding prevalence, prevention, and risks of skin cancer. The purpose would be to increase awareness and prevention.

The 4Ps would go something like this:

Product: As UV light increases wrinkles and aging, a long term product will be healthier, more radiant skin. A short term product will be with less freckles (if that is a deterrent) and less redness (NO ONE looks good sun burnt), as well as an iridescent glow.

f_9ccefb720bPlace: Every time the target audience goes outside they should be practicing safe sun, but because this is so obvious to most of us when it is excessively hot and sunny out, this campaign would target behaviors and exposure in overcast or rain ridden weather specifically. Sunscreen can be applied as a part of make up application for females, or combined with aftershave creams for men. In addition, clothing and hats which cover the skin and head should be worn during prolonged exposure.

Promotion: The distribution of a higher the 30 powered SPF cream (since it’s my campaign we’ll go 75 or 100; my friend calls this red head proof) which is waterproof, has an iridescent shimmer, and can be combined if necessary with makeups and other facial creams would be distributed through partnerships with salons, grocery stores, malls, parks, and at outdoor events (e.g., fairs, concerts, etc.). A campaign ad using humor would be created and information would lead to a website, as well as posted in highly trafficked areas, and on ponchos available at the same places as the SPF cream. The ad would be something clever referencing gingers being evolved vampires and this SPF cream can slowly stop the burning in the sun (or shimmering as it will have the iridescent component to it). We all know the soulless comments. It’s a meme that should be used effectively.

Price: People would have to take the time to put the cream on, but it would initially be offered in free trial packs. The cream would be on sale for a very low price at the same distribution points as mentioned above, but would be even more heavily discounted for red heads. Bottles (such as those with hand sanitizer) would be placed in parks and camp grounds, as well as at outdoor events for on site use.

My positioning statement would be:

“Red heads are most susceptible to skin cancer, the most common form of cancer in the US. Understanding why, how, and when to prevent skin cancer preserves our natural, radiant beauty.”

Or (in true Rocky and Bullwinkle style)

“Red heads are like beautiful plums. Don’t let the sun turn you into a prune.”

References:

Skin cancer. (2011). Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved from: http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/statistics/behavior.htm

Interesting facts about redheads. (2010). Retrieved from: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AF7TMiK9f6A

Gardner, Howard (2006). Changing minds: The art and science of changing our own and other people’s minds. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

Kotler, P & Lee, N.R. (2008). Social marketing: Influencing behaviors for good. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.

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